How Heart Disease Affects the Digestive System

Stomach pain and other gastrointestinal issues can indicate a heart condition like heart disease (i.e., cardiovascular disease). Typically, these gastrointestinal symptoms occur because the heart is having difficulty pumping blood throughout the body. As blood circulation slows, the body chemistry changes from alkaline to acidic: Once the body transitions to this acidic state, organ systems, including the digestive tract, are unable to function properly.

What is Heart Disease?

Cardiovascular disease is characterized by the inability to supply an adequate amount of oxygenated blood to the heart due to the narrowing or blocking of arteries. This narrowing and blocking are caused by a buildup of fatty plaques. This buildup of plaque is dangerous because it can limit blood flow during physical activity, resulting in pain or pressure (i.e., angina) in the chest. Furthermore, when clots form, they can block off the blood flow completely, which will cause the individual to suffer a heart attack or a cardiac arrest. Narrowing and blocking of the arteries can occur elsewhere in the body as well, hindering blood flow and negatively affecting organ systems.

How Cardiovascular Disease Affects the Digestive System

Initially, the stomach pains that may indicate bad heart health are sharp and sporadic; however, as time passes symptoms usually become chronic. These pains frequently occur close to the upper left side section of the stomach. Additionally, pain may be experienced in the esophageal sphincter. These pangs may be happening due to uncommon electrical activity that is being emitted from the heart.

Other symptoms that may indicate heart disease include sweating, nausea, and fatigue. These symptoms can be experienced at the same time or individually. Since these three symptoms may be a sign of myocardial infarction, seeking immediate heart care if these symptoms arise is essential.

Symptoms of gastrointestinal issues due to cardiovascular disease:

  • Intestinal angina — due to the pain and problems associated with eating, people may lose a significant amount of weight. The symptoms of intestinal angina include diarrhea, nausea and/or vomiting following meals. Sharp abdominal pain usually begins within an hour of eating a meal and lasts up to two hours. The pain associated with intestinal angina includes dull cramps located near the pit of the stomach; however, this pain can radiate to the back.
  • Acute intestinal ischemia — this occurs when a blood clot becomes lodged in one of the intestinal arteries. These clots usually originate in the heart and are caused by atrial fibrillation. If severe enough, a portion of the intestine may die, which is a medical emergency.
  • Nausea — although the nausea is related to stomach pain, this symptom also indicates that the individual's heart health is continuing to deteriorate. The stomach’s ability to digest and process nutrients is inhibited due to the body’s continued acidic state. When the body is in this state, the stomach begins producing more hydrochloric acid (HCI), which is the acid used during digestion. As it erodes away the lining of the stomach, this excess HCI causes the individual to experience nausea: If not addressed, this erosion could lead to the formation of an ulcer.

To learn more about how you can improve your heart health with natural heart care, contact Premier Heart and Vein Care today at 1-805-979-4777.

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